Friars Crag

Anyone needing a preview of the beauty and the activities available in the Lake District need look no further than Keswick. Even on an overcast day, it is a charming town.

We had time this weekend to gallivant and share some views with new visitors to our neck of the woods.  We took them over Honister Pass, through Borrowdale and along the River Derwent and Derwent Water to Keswick.  After a quick trip up the main street, we headed toward the water.  En route, we took the requisite Hope Park photo.

The tightly clipped hedging, the venerable Victorian rooftops, and the towering bulk of Blencathra.  Who could resist?

Nor could I not try to capture a photo of the buzzing Bumblebees on a patch of one of my favourite perennials, Japanese anemone. All sorts of insects were having what looked to be a fantastic time, a veritable Pollinator Party.

I’m surprised that there are no Japanese anemones growing in our garden.  They are so pretty and easy to grow.  Must remedy that!

From the field at the head of Derwent Water (site of the Keswick Mountain Festival), the view along the length of the lake is one to share with family and friends who haven’t seen it before.

To the left of the photo, you can see the jetties where boats can be rented from the National Trust. To the right, further into the lake, is Derwent Island. It is the only inhabited island in the entire Lake District National Park. Both island and house are open to a limited number of visitors five times a year.

Accessible only by water, it’s on my list of places to go.

If you find yourself in Keswick, please take the easy and accessible walk down to Friar’s Crag.  The path is maintained, and there are plenty of seats along the short route.

Friar’s Crag was one of John Ruskin’s favourite views and the place of his earliest memory.  Ruskin was a writer, a poet, an artist, an art critic, and a philanthropist. Though plagued by scandal in his love life, he is considered one of the great figures of Victorian social revolution and one of the first proponents of environmentalism.  He was a great thinker.  Due to his close associations with Keswick, you’ll find a slate memorial dedicated to John Ruskin on the crag.

If the bench at the tip of the crag isn’t already occupied, you can sit and do some contemplating yourself.

It was a quick visit for us.  It needn’t be for you.

Peace,

Herdy Girl

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